Totalitarianism In The Soviet Union, Italy, And Germany

587 words - 2 pages

Totalitarianism in the Soviet Union, Italy, and Germany

(by the way, all my essays are not very in depth because we have to write 2-3 600 word essays every week!)

A totalitarian government is a modern autocratic regime in which the state controls all phases of society. It not only seeks to control the economical and political aspects of society, but also tries to direct the daily lives of its citizens. Totalitarianism strives to influence the attitudes, beliefs, and opinions of its people through manipulation of the press and the media. It teaches young men to value their bodies more than their minds, thus creating a politically languid mass of law-conforming puppets. Its ultimate goal is to establish a perfect society based upon its own idealistic aspirations. Different totalitarian systems have different goals. The major totalitarian states that arose during the period following World War I were the Soviet Union under Stalin, fascist Italy under Mussolini, and Nazi Germany under Hitler.

The first real totalitarian government after World War I was Stalin's Soviet Union. The failure of the Communist's proletarian struggle to achieve any significant goals compelled Stalin to undertake some drastic changes to the Communist party. Stalin's idea of "Socialism in One Country" deviated away from the foundations of Communism and emphasized the importance of nationalism. He also postponed Lenin and Marx's idea of "Permanent Revolution". In taking power away from the proletariats, Stalin achieved dictatorial status as the sole leader of the Soviet nation. As dictator, he controlled many aspects of social life, as well as dominating economic and political supremacy. For example, he directed the Great Purge, in which he used violence and aggression to maintain absolute control over the Soviet Union. However, unlike the totalitarian...

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